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JAPONICA


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JAPONICA

Japonica is the first offering for Spring/Summer from This Woman’s Work. The series has its origins in the day-clothes of 1960s American housewives… easy, light, whimsically colored and patterned pieces for errands, chores, and lounging. I was fascinated with the thought of these child-brides having such great responsibilities in the home. I thought of domestic life in many places, but especially domestic life in 1960s America -laundry rooms, kitchens, table linens and other household textiles like tea towels, aprons, rag rugs, sheets, calico quilts.

My choices for colors, shapes and prints also began to reference another love of mine – the Japanese knack for subtlety and playfulness. As the collection developed from here, I was always thinking of the contrast and similarities between these two reference points – post-war domestic American life and my interpretation of Japanese aesthetic and culture.

My mind went further … onto Jeanne Claude & Christo’s umbrella project; to tin dollhouses with trompe l’oeil wallpaper, furniture, curtains and tiles; the tiny plastic people and cars in the board game Life; dolls, doll clothes, and paperdolls; as well as candy, candy wrappers, and marzipan texture – all of these things helped further inform the materials, construction, and overall sensibility of the story.

The result, I hope, is a joyful, light, exuberant grouping of imaginative dress and adornment for modern life.

 




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